University of Cambridge

Remembering the Reformation is an AHRC-funded research project based at the Universities of Cambridge and York http://www.rememberingthereformation.org.uk/research. The project is a collaboration between historians (Prof. Alex Walsham and Prof. Ceri Law, University of Cambridge) and literary scholars (Prof. Brian Cummings and Prof. Bronwyn Wallace, University of York) which aims to investigate how the Reformation was remembered, forgotten, contested and re-invented. Over a period of three years the members of the project will work to illuminate the manner in which memories of the Reformation emerged or were created in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as the complex and plural legacies such memories have left. The project will stage a range of academic and public engagement events, including workshops, conferences and colloquia, lectures, educational workshops for children, and public exhibitions. Great St. Mary’s Church Public Lectures from 7 to 9 September i.a. with James Simpson Professor of English at Harvard University.

Read more: http://www.rememberingthereformation.org.uk/


University of Oslo, Norway

The ambiguous memory of Nordic Protestantism (MEMORY) will study the topography of Nordic Protestantism with emphasis on the cultural role of specific places playing an ambiguous role for the secular/sacred divide.

About the project

MEMORY will apply a spatial perspective for analysing and interpreting the specific character of Nordic Protestant tradition. The concentration on three Nordic countries - Denmark, Sweden, and Norway - will supply a sufficient basis for an overall typological description of the case of Nordic Protestantism.

MEMORY will also give a contribution to the understanding of the specific profile of Nordic secularity. In this region of Europe, the extension of the secular sphere through deconstruction of Catholic sanctity prepared the ground for a new construction of secularity.

Compared to other European Protestant cultures, the secular sites in Scandinavia are not defined in sharp contrast to religious sanctity. Rather, Nordic secularity tends to be more open to including aspects of sanctity in itself. The ambition of this project is to contribute with new answers to a newly started discussion on this topic.

http://www.tf.uio.no/english/research/projects/memory/

 


 

500  Reformation
The Lutheran Council of Great Britain
30 Thanet Street London WC1H 9QH
Registered Charity No. 232042

University of Cambridge

Remembering the Reformation is an AHRC-funded research project based at the Universities of Cambridge and York http://www.rememberingthereformation.org.uk/research. The project is a collaboration between historians (Prof. Alex Walsham and Prof. Ceri Law, University of Cambridge) and literary scholars (Prof. Brian Cummings and Prof. Bronwyn Wallace, University of York) which aims to investigate how the Reformation was remembered, forgotten, contested and re-invented. Over a period of three years the members of the project will work to illuminate the manner in which memories of the Reformation emerged or were created in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as the complex and plural legacies such memories have left. The project will stage a range of academic and public engagement events, including workshops, conferences and colloquia, lectures, educational workshops for children, and public exhibitions. Great St. Mary’s Church Public Lectures from 7 to 9 September i.a. with James Simpson Professor of English at Harvard University.

Read more: http://www.rememberingthereformation.org.uk/


University of Oslo, Norway

The ambiguous memory of Nordic Protestantism (MEMORY) will study the topography of Nordic Protestantism with emphasis on the cultural role of specific places playing an ambiguous role for the secular/sacred divide.

About the project

MEMORY will apply a spatial perspective for analysing and interpreting the specific character of Nordic Protestant tradition. The concentration on three Nordic countries - Denmark, Sweden, and Norway - will supply a sufficient basis for an overall typological description of the case of Nordic Protestantism.

MEMORY will also give a contribution to the understanding of the specific profile of Nordic secularity. In this region of Europe, the extension of the secular sphere through deconstruction of Catholic sanctity prepared the ground for a new construction of secularity.

Compared to other European Protestant cultures, the secular sites in Scandinavia are not defined in sharp contrast to religious sanctity. Rather, Nordic secularity tends to be more open to including aspects of sanctity in itself. The ambition of this project is to contribute with new answers to a newly started discussion on this topic.

http://www.tf.uio.no/english/research/projects/memory/

 


 

500  Reformation
The Lutheran Council of Great Britain
30 Thanet Street London WC1H 9QH
Registered Charity No. 232042